Article


Prevalence of Burn out Syndrome Among Early Career Medical Doctors at the University Teaching Hospital’s Lusaka, Zambia

Dalal Naeem M. I.1, Siulapwa Ntungo, J.2 & Ravi Paul3*

1MBCHB, BSCHB, MMED Psychiatry and Mental health Registrar, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University Teaching Hospitals Adult Clinic 6, Lusaka, Zambia
2MBCHB, BSCHB, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia
3MBBS Neuropsychiatry Consultant, Head, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University Teaching Hospitals Adult Clinic 6, Lusaka, Zambia

Dr. Ravi Paul, MBBS Neuropsychiatry Consultant, Head, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University Teaching Hospitals Adult Clinic 6, Lusaka, Zambia.

Keywords: Burn Out Syndrome (BOS); Occupational Health; Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI); Exhaustion, Depersonalisation; Reduced Personal Accomplishment

Abstract

Background
Graduating as a medical doctor takes an average of 7 years after which another 7 years are invested to be conferred with a consultancy in Zambia. Coupling the many number of years of education to high patient- low doctor ratio, medical doctors are at high risk of occupational health. “Burn Out Syndrome (BOS) is a work related constellation of symptoms that usually occurs in individuals without any prior history of psychological or psychiatric disorders. Medical doctors are at high risk of occupational health leading to BOS. BOS is triggered by a discrepancy between the expectations and ideals of the employee and the actual requirements of their position. In the initial stages of BOS, individuals feel emotional stress and increasing job related disillusionment. Subsequently, they lose the ability to adapt to work environment and display negative attitudes toward their job, co-workers, and their patients. Ultimately, three classic BOS symptoms develop: exhaustion, depersonalisation, and reduced personal accomplishment [1].” Little is known about the prevalence of BOS among Zambian health care service providers and medical doctors in particular. This study explores the factors associated with BOS, its prevalence at the University Teaching Hospital’s (UTH’s) in Lusaka, Zambia and its implications. The study also highlights measures to put in place in order to curb BOS and promote wellbeing among health care providers.

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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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